College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Charlotte Easterling

Assistant Professor
Biology and Physics

  • Ph.D. University of South Florida, 2017
  • B.S. University of Tampa, 2012

Background

Dr. Easterling is a Florida native, spending much of her childhood in various coastal regions of the state. Finding inspiration in the natural world around her from a young age, she went on to major in Marine Science and Biology for her undergraduate career, before honing in on her specialty of anatomy and physiology during her doctorate degree. Following graduate school, Dr. Easterling went on to teach at California State University, Bakersfield prior to joining the faculty at Northwest University. During her free time she enjoys reading, going to concerts with her husband, and spending time with their cat, Rascal, and dog, Indy.

Publications

Charlotte M. Stinsonand Stephen M. Deban (2017). Functional Morphology of Terrestrial Prey Capture in Salamandrid Salamanders. Journal of Experimental Biology, 220: 3896-3907.

Charlotte M. Stinsonand Stephen M. Deban (2017). Functional Trade-offs in the Aquatic Feeding Performance of Salamanders. Zoology, 125C: 69-78.

Jeffrey A. Scales, Charlotte M. Stinson, and Stephen M. Deban (2016). Extreme performance and functional robustness of movement are linked to changes in muscle architecture: comparing elastic and non-elastic feeding movements in salamanders. Journal of Experimental Biology Part A, 000: 1-18.

Daniel Huber, Danielle E. Neveu, Charlotte M. Stinson, Paul A. Anderson and Ilze K. Berzins (2013). Mechanical properties of sand tiger shark Carcharias taurus vertebrae in relation to spinal deformity. Journal of Experimental Biology, 216: 4256-4263.

John T. Froeschke, Bridgette F. Froeschke and Charlotte M. Stinson(2013). Long-term trends of bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science, 70: 13-21.

Thomas P. Hurst, Elena R. Fernandex, Jeremy T. Mathis, Jessica A. Miller, Charlotte M.Stinsonand Ernestine F. Ahgeak (2012). Resiliency of juvenile walleye pollock to projected levels of ocean acidification. Aquatic Biology, 17: 247-259.