Office of the President

President's Blog

Design Thinking and Northwest University

I love my Apple AirPods. What a design marvel they are! The rounded case fits smoothly in my hand and in my pocket. I carry them all day, every day. The pods magnetically jump into their charging slots. The charger works off the same cable that charges the iPhone. Upon opening the case, the charging status of the case and each pod appears on the iPhone screen.

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Video - Raised on the Third Day, Liturgical Rhythms

President Castleberry's message, “Raised on the Third Day, Liturgical Rhythms” at Northwest University Chapel in Kirkland, Washington on October 7, 2019.

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Spiritual Crisis and Christian Higher Education

Each year at Northwest University we host a couple of days of New Student Orientation at the beginning of the academic year—perhaps the most exciting days of the year! Students and their parents tend to rave about the experience, as they plunge delightedly into life at a Christ-centered university.

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Leading Change, and Continuity Too

Changes are inevitable. Some things never change. Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr refers to that reality in his famous Serenity Prayer in its petition that God would grant “the serenity to change the things I can, accept the things I cannot change, and the wisdom to know the difference.” That particular serenity comes in mighty handy to leaders who face the challenge of generating change in their institutions.

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Five Principles for Leaving a Lasting Institutional Legacy

I recently visited a community where my ancestors lived from 1845 until the 1930s. Nothing is left of the community except a white clapboard Baptist church and its cemetery—where four generations of my family lie buried.

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Leaving a Legacy of Leadership | Part 2

Part 1 of this blog entry involved a single-case observation of family leadership transfer and an attempt to derive general principles from that case. To test my observations, I sent the piece to my friend David W. Barnett, whose parents “discipled” him in business leadership and inspired him to pursue a PhD dissertation in leadership at Benedictine University.

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Leaving a Legacy of Leadership | Part 1

“According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, about 90 percent of American businesses are family-owned or controlled.” (https://www.inc.com/encyclopedia/family-owned-businesses.html). That statistic apparently offers an impressive hope for the future prosperity of many families, but in fact, “less than one-third of family-owned businesses survive the transition from the first generation of ownership to the second, and only 13 percent . . . remain in the family over 60 years.” Clearly, in America, the transfer of business leadership within families faces significant challenges.

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The Glory of Leadership

Most people universally agree that leaders should not seek glory, but in contrast, the Bible implies that leaders—and everyone else—should seek glory. In Romans 2:6–7, Paul says God, “will repay each person according to what they have done. To those who by persistence in doing good seek glory, honor and immortality, he will give eternal life.” In fact, leaders (and all of us) should seek glory. But conventional wisdom also has a point. Paul follows up his exhortation to seek glory with the words, “But for those who are self-seeking and who reject the truth and follow evil, there will be wrath and anger.” So we should “seek glory,” and that does not equate to “self-seeking,” but rather stands as the opposite.

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Enchantment and Engagement

In March I had the privilege of preaching in Spanish at a local Hispanic church on the topic of the Lord’s Prayer. So many themes from the Lord’s Prayer speak directly to the immigrant experience, but the final point of my sermon had to do with our tendency to become enchanted with this world—enchanted in a sense similar to “bewitched.” The Apostle John in the New Testament tells us that God “so loved the world” (John 3:16). But we are also warned to not “love the world or anything in the world. If anyone loves the world, love for the Father is not in them” (1 John 2:15). 

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Christian Hope and the Rising Generation

Investment and Trade Fair in Zhengzhou, China, as part of a trade delegation from Bellevue, Washington. At a small dinner with the Trade Minister for Henan province, I told the dignitaries around the table that America’s greatest export is hope. Such an export in turn creates our greatest import: immigrants. Drawn to America by the real hope that our system offers for a better life, those newcomers can rise to the highest expressions of American identity, freedom, and influence within their lifetime. As proof of the concept, our group included four highly successful Chinese-American immigrants, now citizens, including a former mayor and current city councilman from Bellevue. 

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